Literary Agents and Where to Find Them

If you’re pursuing the traditional route of publishing, then your world will slowly revolve around query letters and literary agents. Initially, I was going to compare finding an agent to dating, using the timeless analogy that it takes a number of bad dates (rejection letters) to land on the one that’s meant to be. ButContinue reading “Literary Agents and Where to Find Them”

Writing Action Scenes: With Guest Author Matt Romeo

When we hear the term ‘action scene’ we often think fight scenes, car chases, and explosions. But the truth is, action scenes can have all of the above, but it’s not a requirement. However, there are a few things that you will always want to consider and include when you sit down to write anContinue reading “Writing Action Scenes: With Guest Author Matt Romeo”

Where to Self-Publish: with Guest Author Tenaya MKD

I am very excited to share this guest author post, by the lovely and talented Tenaya MKD. Fresh from releasing her debut novel, New Identity, Tenaya knows a thing or two about where an indie-author can self-publish their book. Once you make the decision to self-publish, the information overload can be overwhelming, I’m so excitedContinue reading “Where to Self-Publish: with Guest Author Tenaya MKD”

Romancing the Beat Overview: Featuring Disney’s Tangled

While writing the post: 5 Tips for Writing Romantic Subplots, my fifth tip was to utilize romantic story structure and I recommend checking out Romancing the Beat by Gwen Hayes (which also has a Scrivener template). But I wanted to include my own overview. Quick disclaimer: This overview is pretty true to Gwen Hayes’ beats,Continue reading “Romancing the Beat Overview: Featuring Disney’s Tangled”

5 Tips for Writing Romantic Subplots

I’m a sucker for a heart-thumping, palm-sweating romance. And regardless of what niche genre you write in, there’s often an acceptable place for a romantic subplot. Just as we love to plunge into quests and adventures, readers love to read about love because it opens a little window for the reader to feel and connectContinue reading “5 Tips for Writing Romantic Subplots”

A Newbie’s Guide to Self-Editing a Novel

This month, I wrote “the end” on the second book in The Uprising series. With beta-reader feedback returned for book 1, it’s time for me to dive back into editing. After I wrote the first book, I did a pretty quick job of my first editing pass. While I did cut 10,000 words, I stillContinue reading “A Newbie’s Guide to Self-Editing a Novel”

Creating A Book Bible: With Guest Author Megan Beth Davies

This week, I have guest author, Megan Beth Davies, to talk about one super helpful writing resource…a writing resource that’s so personalized to your story, it’s like you’ve created it yourself…because, well, you did. Megan is a fantasy writer like myself, which naturally comes with a ton of planning (and some organization required). From worldContinue reading “Creating A Book Bible: With Guest Author Megan Beth Davies”

10 Writing tips to Evoke Emotion

How to write prose that tugs at the reader’s heart strings When writing fiction, there’s a good chance that you’re hoping to get the reader to feel something: happy, sad, fearful, panicked, lustful (or, if you’re like me, all of the above). Personally, I get a weird twinge of satisfaction when someone tells me myContinue reading “10 Writing tips to Evoke Emotion”

Writing A Series: With Guest Author Skye Horn

As we approach the New Year, many of us set ourselves up by establishing goals. On nearly every resolution list for the past few years, I’ve set a goal to write a book. But once you have written one book, you might realize it has “series potential” or you might decide off the bat thatContinue reading “Writing A Series: With Guest Author Skye Horn”

How to use Motivation-Reaction Units to Enhance Your Storytelling

I recently did a whole post about scene-sequel story structure. While the concept of a scene followed by its sequel is the large-scale structure (or the building blocks) of a story, Motivation-Reaction Units (or MRUs for short) are the minuscule pieces that create those blocks.   The idea of Motivation-Reaction Units was first found inContinue reading “How to use Motivation-Reaction Units to Enhance Your Storytelling”